The Sisters of The Good Samaritan - Protection of Children, Young People and Vulnerable Adults
April 2011

Enormity of Japan disaster continues to unfold

One month after a massive magnitude nine earthquake and ten-metre high tsunami ravaged north-eastern Japan, the enormity of the tragedy continues to unfold.

Reports suggest over 12,000 people have died, around 15,000 remain missing and 173,000 are displaced and living in evacuation centres. While the destruction of homes, public infrastructure and livelihoods is immense, the sinister threat of a nuclear crisis weighs heavily on the people.

In an interview with The Good Oil, Good Samaritan Sister Haruko Morikawa described the current mood of people in Japan as a mixture of sorrow, panic, fear, stress and powerlessness.

“It will take time for us to digest or reflect or to find the meaning from this reality,” she said.

Haruko lives in Nara, near Kyoto, about 600 kilometres south-west of the disaster zone. While physically removed from this area, she and the other Good Samaritan sisters in her community feel a strong spiritual connection with people in north-eastern Japan and are very conscious of their suffering, hardship and loss.

“As the sky, land and sea are in common or connected, people’s hearts are so near to us and rather part of us,” Haruko said.

“I can imagine how they are feeling: they’ve lost family; they’re searching for friends, relatives or neighbours.

“In that area it’s very, very cold. People have no fuel, electricity, gasoline or food. People have lost everything. People are packed in relocation centres and sometimes cannot move freely. Some elderly people were saved from the tsunami but have died in the relocation centre.”

Some of the sisters in Haruko’s community have family or friends in the north-east. A week after the earthquake, Haruko received news that her cousins were safe in one of the many evacuation centres. They were among the fortunate who could return to their home.

Haruko knows what it is like to experience an earthquake. Sixteen years ago she was living in Kansai when the magnitude 7.2 Kobe earthquake struck. It wasn’t as strong as last month’s quake and didn’t cause a tsunami, but over 6,000 people died and there were fires, aftershocks and significant destruction.

Haruko believes Japanese people are more aware of the dangers of nuclear power since the recent earthquake damaged the Fukushima nuclear plant and unleashed the threat of a nuclear crisis.

While critical of her government’s decision to use nuclear power with very little consultation about the potential dangers, Haruko said people in Japan also needed to take responsibility for the disaster because of their ignorance and a consumerist mentality.

“I think it’s our fault first because we want to improve our economy and we wanted to be richer and richer. So we are not able to know that kind of danger of nuclear plant, instead we pursued only the development,” she explained.

“We experienced the fear of nuclear bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but in spite of that, we rely on the nuclear power as if the electricity from the nuclear power comes without any cost to us.”

Haruko is appreciative of the many supportive and prayerful emails she has received from sisters and friends in Australia since the March 11 disaster and has passed these messages on to other Japanese people who have felt strengthened and encouraged to keep going.

“That kind of international support is very strong for the people in suffering area,” said Haruko.

“Our sympathy and encouragement can reach the people so quickly and sometimes they need those kinds of support more than some material support.”

The Good Samaritan Sisters have had a long and close connection with the people of Japan. In 1948 they responded to an appeal from the Bishop of Nagasaki, Paul Yamaguchi, for an Australian order of sisters to help in the reconstruction of his diocese which had been devastated by the 1945 atomic bomb.

Today eight Japanese sisters continue to minister in Nara and one is in the Philippines.

“As a congregation, we are united in solidarity with our sisters in Japan, their families and all the people of Japan as they come to understand the grief and enormity of this tragedy that has struck them,” said Clare Condon, Leader of the Good Samaritan Sisters.

Recalling the observations of the first five sisters who arrived in Nagasaki shortly after the end of World War II, Clare said they were moved by the people’s strong will to rebuild and to improve on their lives despite the desolation that surrounded them.

“As a congregation we will pray that this strong will continues for the people of north-eastern Japan as they begin to rebuild their lives.”

 

「日本の大惨事、まだまだ拡大」

 

マグニチュード9という巨大な大地震と10メートルの津波が日本の東北部を壊滅させて1ヶ月経過した今、この大惨事は、なお拡大し続けている。The Good Oilは最近、善きサマリア人修道会の森川晴子シスターに状況を尋ねた。

死者は12,000人以上、約15,000人が行方不明、173,000 人が避難所での生活を強いられていると報告されている。家屋、公共インフラ、生活は崩壊、原子力の脅威は人々に重くのしかかっている。

The Good Oilのインタビューで、善きサマリア人修道会の森川晴子シスターは、日本の現在の雰囲気は悲痛、パニック、恐怖、ストレス、無力さが入り混じったようだと表現した。

「私たちがこの現実を十分理解し、内省し、そこから意味を見出すまでに暫く時間がかかるでしょう。」と述べた。

晴子さんは京都の近くにある奈良市、被災地から南西に約600キロの地に住んでいる。この被災地からは物理的には離れているが、彼女および彼女の共同体に住む他の善きサマリア人修道会のシスターは、東北の人々と強い精神的なつながりを感じ、彼らの苦しみ、困難、喪失感という意識を強く感じているとのこと。

「空、土地、海は共通でつながっているように、人々の心も私たちに近く、というよりむしろ私たちの一部のようです。」と晴子さんは述べた。

「彼らがどのように感じているか想像できます: 家族を亡くし; 友達、親戚、近所の人たちを探しているのです。」

「あの地域はとても、とても寒いのです。人々は燃料も電気もガソリンも食物もないのです。人々は何もかも失ってしまったのです。人々は避難所に詰め込まれ、時には自由に動くことすらできません。お年寄りの中には津波からは救われたものの避難所で亡くなった方もいます。」

「晴子さんの共同体に住むシスターの中には、家族や友人が東北に住んでいる人がいます。」 地震発生1週間後に、晴子さんは彼女のいとこは無事で避難所のどこかにいるという知らせを受けました。その人たちは自宅に帰ることができる恵まれた人たちの一人なのです。

晴子さんは地震の経験はどんなものかよく知っている。16年前、マグニチュード7.2の阪神大震災が襲った時、関西に住んでいた。先月の地震ほど震度は強くなく、津波を引き起こす恐れもなかったが、6,000人以上の死者、火災が発生し、余震もひどく崩壊も激しかった。

晴子さんは、今回の地震は福島原発に被害をもたらし、原子力の危機という脅威を招いたので、日本人は原子力の危険性をますます認識していると考える。

潜在的な危険について十分に協議することなく原子力を利用するという政府の決断に批判的である一方、晴子さんは、日本の人も自分達の無知と消費主義的な考え方をしてきたという理由で、この災害の責任をとる必要があると述べた。

「先ずそれは私たちのせいだと思います。なぜならば私たちは自国の経済発展を望み、より豊かになることばかり望んでいました。ですから原子力発電のそのような危険性すら知ることすらできず、その代わりに発展ばかりを求めてきたのです。」と彼女は説明した。

「私たちは広島と長崎で原子爆弾の恐怖を経験しました。しかしそれにも拘らず、まるで原発で発電された電力の代価は無いかのごとく、私たちは原子力発電に依存しています。」

晴子さんは3月11日の大惨事以降、オーストラリアのシスターや友人から支援のメールや祈りをこめたメールを受信し、感謝している。これらのメッセージを他の日本人に転送し、彼らは強められ、頑張ろうと励みになっている。

「そのような海外からのサポートは被災地の人々にとって非常に力強いものとなります。」と晴子さんは語った。

「私たちの同情と励ましは人々に迅速に伝わり、時には物質的な支援よりもそのようなサポートの方が必要な場合もあります。」

善きサマリア人修道会は、日本の人々と長年にわたる密接な関係がある。1948年には、オーストラリアの修道会は1945年の原子爆弾によって壊滅状態にあった司教区の再建を助けて欲しいというポール山口長崎司教様の要請に応えたのである。

今日、8人の日本人シスターが奈良で、1人がフィリピンで奉仕職を継続している。

「修道会として、彼女たちに与えた大惨事の巨大な影響と深い悲しみを理解するにつけ、私たちは日本の私たちのシスター、彼女たちの家族および日本のすべての人々と一致団結します。」と善きサマリア人修道会のリーダーであるクレア・コンドンは述べた。

第二次世界大戦終戦直後、長崎に到着した最初の5人のシスターが観察した様子を思い起こすと、彼女たちは、周りの荒廃にもかかわらず、再建し、生活を改善させようという人々の強い意志力に心を動かされていたとクレアは語った。

「修道会として、東北の人々が生活を立て直すにあたり、この強い意志力を持ち続けられるように私たちは祈ります。」

The Good Oil

"The Good Oil", the free, monthly e-magazine of the Good Samaritan Sisters, publishes news, feature and opinion articles and reflective content which aims to nourish the spirit, stimulate thinking and encourage reflection and dialogue about issues of the day from a Good Samaritan perspective.

If you would like to republish this article, please contact the editor.